Red Cross in Mauritius

MRCS helps in natural calamities, health education, providing First Aid and First Aid Courses

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Why have a Red Cross in Mauritius when there is no war?

MRCS helps in natural calamities, health education, providing First Aid and First Aid Courses, and in various social and community services.

A) Mauritius Red Cross contributes to the improvement of health, prevention of disease and mitigation of suffering by programmes of training and services for the benefit of the community. These are adapted to national and local needs and circumstances in conformity with the objects and purposes of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.

(B) Mauritius is not involved in war or conflicts.
We appreciate the substantial subsidies and grants we obtain for our Red Cross activities from the Republic of Mauritius and assistance with the Clinical Attachment Training Scheme of our Aides-Soignants members by the Ministry of Health in recent years.
As we did in 1968 and 1972 the Mauritius Red Cross continues to offer its help to the Ministry of Health of this country in connection with any Nurses strike or go-slow, which would inevitably increase the suffering of innocent hospital and dispensary patients.
We offer our services with no intention of taking sides in any syndical or political action.
We have a reserve team of qualified, non- practicing nurses who are assisted by our first aiders who have passed the initial, intermediate or proficiency exams and by aides- soignants members and by our professional first aid instructors

Social welfare activities:
Members lend a helping hand to people with disabilities by visiting residential homes. Our Aides-Soignants (Nurses Aids) qualified through our Training Unit assist in this activity.
Visits to the needy in hospices and nursing homes
Recreational activities are organised for the elderly living in nursing homes and for children being cared for in orphanages.



About MRCS

Mauritius Red Cross Society helps in natural calamities, health education, providing First Aid and offering First Aid Courses, and in various social and community services

 

Other Addresses of Mauritius Red Cross in Mauritius

Mauritius Red Cross Society
HEAD QUARTERS
Ste. THERESE STREET,
CUREPIPE
MAURITIUS
TEL +230 676 3604
FAX +230 674 8855
e-mail : redcross[at]mauritiusredcross[dot]com

SOUTH BRANCH
Teste de Buch Street,
Curepipe.
Tel (230) 6761181
e-mail: south[at]mauritiusredcross[dot]com

EAST & CENTRAL BRANCH
Ambrose Street,
Rose – Hill
Tel (230)4641777
e-mail: east[at]mauritiusredcross[dot]com

NORTH BRANCH
SSR National Hospital,
Pamplemousses
Tel (230) 2433573
e-mail : north[at]mauritiusredcross[dot]com

WEST BRANCH
Loretto Convent Street,
Vacoas
Tel (230) 6964763
e-mail : west[at]mauritiusredcross[dot]com

RODRIGUES BRANCH
Jenner Street,
Port Mathurin,
Rodrigues Tel (230) 8311622
e-mail : rodrigues[at]mauritiusredcross[dot]com

YOUTH SECTION
Loretto Convent Street,
Vacoas Tel (230) 6868827
e-mail : youth[at]mauritiusredcross[dot]com



The seven Fundamental Principles

Proclaimed in Vienna in 1965, the seven Fundamental Principles bond together the National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, The International Committee of the Red Cross and the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. They guarantee the continuity of the Red Cross Red Crescent Movement and its humanitarian work.

Humanity
The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, born of a desire to bring assistance without discrimination to the wounded on the battlefield, endeavours, in its international and national capacity, to prevent and alleviate human suffering wherever it may be found. Its purpose is to protect life and health and to ensure respect for the human being. It promotes mutual understanding, friendship, cooperation and lasting peace amongst all peoples. Read more about the principle of Humanity.

Impartiality
It makes no discrimination as to nationality, race, religious beliefs, class or political opinions. It endeavours to relieve the suffering of individuals, being guided solely by their needs, and to give priority to the most urgent cases of distress. Read more about the principle of Impartiality.

Neutrality
In order to continue to enjoy the confidence of all, the Movement may not take sides in hostilities or engage at any time in controversies of a political, racial, religious or ideological nature. Read more about the principle of Neutrality.
Independence
The Movement is independent. The National Societies, while auxiliaries in the humanitarian services of their governments and subject to the laws of their respective countries, must always maintain their autonomy so that they may be able at all times to act in accordance with the principles of the Movement. Read more about the principle of Independence.
Voluntary service
It is a voluntary relief movement not prompted in any manner by desire for gain. Read more about the principle of Voluntary service.
Unity
There can be only one Red Cross or one Red Crescent Society in any one country. It must be open to all. It must carry on its humanitarian work throughout its territory. Read more about the principle of Unity.
Universality
The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, in which all Societies have equal status and share equal responsibilities and duties in helping each other, is worldwide. Read more about the principle of Universality.

Humanity
The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, born of a desire to bring assistance without discrimination to the wounded on the battlefield, endeavours, in its international and national capacity, to prevent and alleviate human suffering wherever it may be found. Its purpose is to protect life and health and to ensure respect for the human being. It promotes mutual understanding, friendship, cooperation and lasting peace amongst all peoples.

Analysis of the Fundamental Principle of Humanity
The text under the Fundamental Principle of Humanity includes the following elements:
• it recalls the origins of the Movement: “born of a desire to bring assistance without discrimination to the wounded on the battlefield”;
• it recalls the double dimension of the Movement: the national and the international one;
• it defines the mission of the Movement: “to prevent and alleviate human suffering wherever it may be found”;
• it defines the purposes of the Movement:
• to protect life and health;
• to ensure respect for the human being;
• To promote mutual understanding, friendship, cooperation and lasting peace amongst all peoples.

Consequences of the Fundamental principle of Humanity
The consequences of the principle of Humanity are not so much boundaries and guidelines for the action, as the other Fundamental Principles are: the principle of Humanity is rather a constant reminder of what the objectives of the Movement are. The principle of Humanity expresses what the Movement places beyond anything else: the need to act in order to prevent and alleviate human suffering.

Impartiality
It makes no discrimination as to nationality, race, religious beliefs, class or political opinions. It endeavours to relieve the suffering of individuals, being guided solely by their needs, and to give priority to the most urgent cases of distress.

Analysis of the Fundamental Principle of Impartiality
The text under the Fundamental Principle of Impartiality includes the following elements:
• the Movement makes no discrimination – and this does not apply only to people it assists or protects. Non-discrimination is the refusal to apply distinctions of an adverse nature to human beings simply because they belong to a specific category. This does not exclude differences in the treatment given to people placed in different situations on the basis of, for example, sex or age. Five criteria which could lead to discrimination are mentioned: nationality, race, religious beliefs, class or political opinions. However, other factors which may lead to discrimination are not mentioned. Depending on circumstances, a different treatment based on sex may be discrimination or not.
• all those in need shall be helped, yet to treat everyone in the same way without taking into account how much they are suffering, or how urgent their needs are, would not be equitable. Impartiality means that, for the Movement, the only priority that can be set in dealing with those who require help must be based on need, and the order in which available aid is shared out must correspond to the urgency of the distress it is intended to relieve.

Consequences of the Fundamental principle of Impartiality
The consequences of the principle of Impartiality are as follows:
• it establishes one of its key values: non-discrimination, which is one of the most important elements of all aspects of the protection of the human being: human rights law, humanitarian law, refugee law.
• although the need to “enjoy the confidence of all” is mentioned about the principle of Neutrality, this also applies to the principle of Impartiality. Only an impartial action can give the image of an organization that can be trusted by people to be assisted or protected. Therefore, systems have to be put in place to ensure that the people benefitting from the action of the Red Cross and Red Crescent are those whose vulnerability is the highest.
• impartiality in its true sense requires that subjective distinctions be set aside. To illustrate the difference between the two notions: a National Society that refuses to provide its services to a specific group of people, because of their ethnic origin, fails to observe the rule of non-discrimination; whereas a National Society staff member who, in the exercise of his functions, favours a friend by giving him better treatment than that given to others, contravenes the principle of impartiality. Therefore, staff and volunteers should be trained to ensure that correct behaviour becomes almost a reflex.

No site da LOTECE além de poder conferir todos os resultados dos jogos, o apostador tem acesso a uma tabela dos sonhos, onde tudo que ele sonhou quando estava dormindo, representa um dos números da Loteria dos Sonhos, ideal pra quem não sabe em que número apostar. Para apostar e ser sorteado basta dizer que quer uma loteria dos sonhos tabela. Uma forma de apostar em todas as cidades do Brasil é nas Loterias, tentando ganhar a Lotofácil, por exemplo.

 

Neutrality
In order to continue to enjoy the confidence of all, the Movement may not take sides in hostilities or engage at any time in controversies of a political, racial, religious or ideological nature.

Analysis of the Fundamental Principle of Neutrality
The text under the Fundamental principle of Neutrality includes three elements:
• the purpose of complying with the principle of Neutrality is to enjoy the confidence of all. Implicitly, this compliance with the principle of Neutrality is also a condition for operational efficiency, which requires confidence of all in many contexts, i.e. not only in armed conflicts contexts;
• the principle of Neutrality prohibits a component of the Movement from taking part in hostilities;
• the principle of Neutrality prohibits the Movement from engaging at any time in controversies of a political, racial, religious or ideological nature.

Consequences of the Fundamental principle of Neutrality
The consequences of the principle of Neutrality are the following:
• neutrality implies not acting in a way that could facilitate the conduct of hostilities by any of the parties involved. The role of National Societies as auxiliaries to public authorities in the humanitarian field when they assist medical services of armed forces – i.e. when they fulfill the initial function of National Societies – should not be seen as taking part in hostilities;
• the neutrality includes many dimensions. Only the day-to-day acts and words of a National Society can constitute an evidence of its respect of the principle of Neutrality. For instance, if a National Society branch expresses sympathy for a movement, a cause or a political figure, for example by permitting the latter to take advantage of Red Cross or Red Crescent membership for electoral purposes, many volunteers may cancel their membership. If a dispensary run by a National Society also displays a religious affiliation in a country in which there is tension between the members of different faiths, many patients will no longer wish or dare to come for treatment. In other words, neutrality is a state of mind, an attitude which must guide every step taken by the Movement’s components;
• due to the character of communication today, the violation of the principle of Neutrality by a component of the Movement can easily affect the image of other components and, thus, their ability to work in a given context. Therefore, the principle of Neutrality is to be seen in a global perspective.
Independence
The Movement is independent. The National Societies, while auxiliaries in the humanitarian services of their governments and subject to the laws of their respective countries, must always maintain their autonomy so that they may be able at all times to act in accordance with the principles of the Movement.

Analysis of the Fundamental principle of Independence
The text under the Fundamental principle of Independence includes the following elements:
• a strong general statement that, as a matter of principle, the Movement is independent;
• more detailed explanations on the specific case of National Societies regarding independence: this puts the focus on the balance between, on the one hand, their status as auxiliary to public authorities in the humanitarian field and their submission to national law, and on the other hand, the need to maintain their autonomy.

Consequences of the Fundamental Principle of Independence
The consequences of the principle of Independence are:
• independence is one of the key elements that the Movement wants to maintain, despite the fact that no concrete consequences are explicitly defined by the principle itself. In its broadest sense, the principle of independence is understood as meaning that the Red Cross and Red Crescent must resist any interference, whether political, ideological or economic, capable of diverting it from the course of action laid down by the requirements of humanity, impartiality and neutrality;
• the need for National Societies to enjoy a status allowing them to act at all times in accordance with the principles of the Movement. This has consequences on the legal status of National Societies in their country, their relations to public authorities, etc. The degree of autonomy necessary to a National Society cannot be defined uniformly and absolutely, since it depends partly on the political, economic and social conditions in the country. It must be free to relinquish certain tasks or to change its priorities in accordance with the material and human resources at its disposal. Its role as auxiliary to the public authorities does not in the least prevent a National Society from freely choosing the activities it carries out completely independently of the State.
• The violation of the Fundamental Principle of Independence is often perceived as a serious threat to the integrity of a National Society. However, the debate on the independence of the Movement is broader than the question of the relationship between public authorities and a National Society, although that last aspect is a very important one.

Voluntary service
It is a voluntary relief movement not prompted in any manner by desire for gain.

Analysis of the Fundamental principle of Voluntary service
The text under the Fundamental principle of Voluntary service includes the following elements:
• the Movement is a voluntary relief movement;
• the Movement is not prompted in any manner by desire for gain.

Consequences of the Fundamental principle of Voluntary service
The consequences of the principle of Voluntary service are as follows:
• the Movement is a volunteer-based organisation;
• if the Movement fails to recognize the value of voluntary it is in danger of becoming bureaucratic, losing touch with a vital source of motivation, inspiration and initiative, and of cutting off the roots which maintain its contact with human needs and enable it to meet them;
• Voluntary service, a source of economy. Imagine how much suffering would have to be neglected, for lack of means, if all the work done by volunteers had to be paid for. It is sometimes sufficient to have a relatively small but motivated support staff, with the necessary minimum of financial resources, to enable volunteers to render community services whose cost could never be borne either by the National Society or by the State.

Unity
There can be only one Red Cross or one Red Crescent Society in any one country. It must be open to all. It must carry on its humanitarian work throughout its territory.

Analysis of the Fundamental principle of Unity
The text under the Fundamental principle of Unity are threefold – each aspect directly matches each sentence of that principle’s text; these aspects are also included in the conditions for recognition of National Societies by the ICRC:
• there can be only one Red Cross or one Red Crescent Society in any one country;
• a National Society must be open to all;
• a National Society must carry on its humanitarian work throughout its territory.

Consequences of the Fundamental principle of Unity
The consequences of the principle of Unity are quite easy to analyse from the text:
• a National Society could oppose to the creation of another Red Cross of Red Crescent Society in its country. As States have agreed to Fundamental Principles, they have an obligation to ensure that no other Society can be created on their territory if they have already recognised a National Society;
• a National Society has to open its membership to a broad base in the population. It has to recruit its members from all the ethnic, social and other groups in the country to ensure better efficiency of its action. In any case, any discrimination in the recruitment of members would be a violation of the principle of Unity;
• a National Society has to be active in all parts of the country. This does not necessarily mean that the level of activities has to be the same country-wide: the principle of Impartiality may well justify that more activities are undertaken in the parts of a country where the needs are the largest. But what it prohibits is that a region is excluded from the activities of a National Society in a discriminatory manner (e.g. for reasons related with religion, ethnicity, etc.).

Universality
The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, in which all Societies have equal status and share equal responsibilities and duties in helping each other, is worldwide.

Analysis of the Fundamental principle of Universality
The text under the Fundamental principle of Universality includes the following elements:
• the Movement is worldwide;
• all Societies have equal status in the Movement;
• all Societies share equal responsibilities and duties in helping each other.

Consequences of the Fundamental principle of Universality
The consequences of the principle of Universality are threefold:
• one of the objectives of the Movement is to become universal, since it is one of the Movement’s strengths that it has a National Society in almost every country of the world. There are a number of States which so far do not have a recognised National Society. However, this is to be seen as a temporary situation: once obstacles preventing Societies of those States to be recognised are lifted, the Movement will become truly global;
• solidarity between National Societies, which is the basis for cooperation between Societies;
• with regard to decision-making, all Societies carry one vote at the Federation’s General Assembly, the Council of Delegates and the International Conference, irrelevant of their size or wealth.



Henry Dunant

Henry Dunant (1828-1910) : The man whose vision led to the creation of the worldwide Red Cross and Red Crescent movement; he went from riches to rags but became joint recipient of the first Nobel peace prize.

Henry Dunant, who was born in Geneva on 8 May 1828, came from a devout and charitable Calvinist family. After incomplete secondary schooling, he was apprenticed to a Geneva bank. In 1853, he travelled to Algeria to take charge of the Swiss colony of Sétif. He started construction of a wheat mill, but could not obtain the land concession that was essential for its operation. After travelling to Tunisia he returned to Geneva, where he decided to approach Napoleon III to obtain the business document he needed.

At the time, the Emperor was commanding the Franco-Sardinian troops fighting the Austrians in northern Italy, and it was there that Henry Dunant decided to seek him out. This was how he came to be present at the end of the battle of Solferino, in Lombardy.

Returning to Geneva, he wrote A Memory of Solferino, which eventually led to the creation of the International Committee for Relief to the Wounded, the future International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). Dunant was a member and acted as secretary. He was now famous and was received by heads of State, kings and princes of the European courts. But his financial affairs were floundering and he was declared bankrupt in 1867. Completely ruined, he was in debt for almost a million Swiss francs (1860s value).

Henry Dunant – Red Cross Founder

Dunant resigns from the Committee As a result of the scandal which this bankruptcy caused in Geneva, he resigned from his post as secretary of the International Committee. On 8 September 1867 the Committee decided to accept his resignation not only as secretary but also as a member. Dunant left for Paris, where he was reduced to sleeping on public benches. At the same time, however, the Empress Eugénie summoned him to the Tuileries Palace in order to consult him on extending the Geneva Convention to naval warfare. Dunant was made an honorary member of the national Red Cross societies of Austria, Holland, Sweden, Prussia and Spain.

During the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, he visited and comforted the wounded brought to Paris and introduced the wearing of a badge so that the dead could be identified.

When peace returned, Dunant travelled to London, where he endeavoured to organize a diplomatic conference on the problem of prisoners of war; the Tsar encouraged him but England was hostile to the plan.

Years of poverty

An international congress for the “complete and final abolition of the traffic in Negroes and the slave trade” opened in London on 1 February 1875, on Dunant’s initiative. There followed years of wandering and utter poverty for Dunant: he travelled on foot in Alsace, Germany and Italy, living on charity and the hospitality of a few friends.

Finally, in 1887, he ended up in the Swiss village of Heiden, overlooking Lake Constance, where he fell ill. He found refuge in the local hospice, and it was there that he was discovered in 1895 by a journalist, Georg Baumberger, who wrote an article about him which, within a few days, was reprinted in the press throughout Europe. Messages of sympathy reached Dunant from all over the world; overnight he was once more famous and honoured. In 1901, he received the Nobel Peace Prize.

Henry Dunant died on 30 October 1910. The date of his birth, 8 May, is celebrated as World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day.



Cristiano Ronaldo has been named ambassador

Portugal’s Cristiano Ronaldo has been named ambassador for the UEFA EURO 2008™ Score for the Red Cross online fundraising campaign which kicked off on 26 March.

Purchase virtual goals
Internet users will be able to help their favourite side win the title of Most Humanitarian Team by purchasing virtual goals on scorefortheredcross.org. The winning team will be announced on 6 July. The Score for the Red Cross campaign, jointly organised by UEFA and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), will benefit land-mine victims in Afghanistan by providing them with artificial limbs, physiotherapy and vocational training.

UEFA has chosen the ICRC as its official humanitarian partner for EURO 2008™, which will be held in Austria and Switzerland.

What does this partnership consist of?

Michel Platini, president of UEFA, and Jakob Kellenberger, president of the ICRC, launched an online fundraising operation entitled Score for the Red Cross to raise money for the victims of anti-personnel mines in Afghanistan. With a single click, a visitor to the website can support the Red Cross and at the same time help their team win the title of Most Humanitarian Team of EURO 2008™.

UEFA will donate to the ICRC all receipts from the sale of “Score for the Red Cross” wristbands.

UEFA will encourage fans to support the campaign on www.euro2008.com.

UEFA will donate 4,000 euro to the ICRC for each goal scored during the tournament.

The ICRC will use 50% of the the funds collected to improve the lives of mine victims in Afghanistan, by providing them with artificial limbs and physiotherapy.In addition, the ICRC will support the reintegration of mine victims into their families and communities, by offering vocational training and the opportunity to start small businesses.

Several Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies are participating in this fundraising operation, and the remaining 50% of the funds collected will be donated to these National Societies to enable them to finance emergency aid, medical or social programmes in their respective countries.



Maha Shivratree Festival

The volunteers of the National Society have been on duty as first aiders for the pilgrims to the Ganga Talao as from Thursday 19 February 2009.

Under the supervision of Navin Mahadoo, some 20 volunteers will be on duty on a 24hr basis until 13hrs on Monday 23 February 2009. Many pilgrims have already started their pilgrimage from all over the island, and we expect a very large number as from Friday.

The Maha Shivratree Festival usually attracts some 400,000 to 500,000 persons from all over the island to the Ganga Talao – Grand Bassin. People go there to pray Lord Shiva, and they bring back holy water from the lake to pour it symbolically on the ‘ Shivling’.
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About MRCS

Mauritius Red Cross Society helps in natural calamities, health education, providing First Aid and offering First Aid Courses, and in various social and community services



NGO fair 2009

La Mauritius Council of Social Service (MACOSS), en collaboration avec ‘Free and Reunited Together (Free ART)’ de l’Université de Maurice, a organisé un ‘NGO Fair 2009’ le 10 et 11 février 2009 à l’auditorium Octave Wiehe, Université de Maurice.

Les objectifs de cet événement étaient :

·        De regrouper un maximum d’ONGs  sur le campus

·        De faire connaitre l’importance de ces ONGs  aux étudiants de l’université et à la jeunesse de Maurice

·        De donner une opportunité à ces ONGs de promouvoir leur travail

·        Les ONGs pourraient recruter des volontaires/membres

·        Les ONGs seraient plus près de la communauté estudiantine et le public

·        N’importe quel Mauricien pourrait offrir ses services à ces ONGs

La Mauritius Red Cross Society avait accepté l’invitation et était présente à l’exhibition.

Pendant ces deux jours, les facilitateurs des différentes ONGs participants à la foire sont intervenus sur des thèmes comme La Pauvreté, La Santé, le bon Traitement des animaux, L’Environnement, Les Handicapés, La Jeunesse et d’autres sujets ayant traits à des activités sociales.

Des présentations sur ‘L’histoire du Mouvement International de la Croix Rouge et du Croissant Rouge’ et ‘La Préparation et Réponse aux désastres’  et ‘La Réduction des risques’ furent faites le 11.02.2009.

Ci-après les extraits d’un quotidien paru le lendemain :

« Promouvoir le volontariat et donner l’envie aux jeunes de faire du social c’est le combat de longue haleine. C’est ce que font comprendre les représentants de plusieurs institutions et autres associations. Toutefois, même cela est un travail difficile. Il s’agit avant tout de croire aux capacités des jeunes et de leur offrir la chance de démontrer leurs talents.

« C’est ce qui ressort de la foire pour le organisations non gouvernementales qui s’est tenue ces deux derniers jours à l’universite de Maurice. »




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